Sounds of GPP’16

The Global Perspectives Program is an intellectually stimulated and academic enriching experience.  GPP is about growth, both personal and professional.  It is a social and community or relationship building experience including elements of sharing space, finding place, and communicating.  GPP is a collective and individual journey that can be enjoyed through our multiple senses. The GPP’16 experience has been documented through multiple venues and media.  The many visuals (e.g., tweets – #gppswiss16 and @gppvt, instagram, Facebook) and narratives (e.g., tripvis, tweets, blogs, posts) will capture the essence of GPP’16.  The GPP experience also includes a variety of tastes (e.g., coffee, food, wine) and smells (e.g., chocolate, bread, cheeses, flowers).  The kinesthetic sense was definitely experienced by walking 5-10 miles/day, often achieving more than 15,000 steps/day (as determined by Fitbits and other such devices), and climbing stairs regularly.  And the particular motions of the trains. Another sense we experienced – sound.  Inasmuch as sounds were so much a part of our daily lives in the past two weeks yet relegated more to the background than the visuals, tastes and smells, I will take this opportunity to reflect upon and highlight some of the sounds of GPP’16. Church bells.  One of the first things that we noticed is the regular ringing of the church bells.  They are ever-present in announcing the “time” in fifteen minute intervals – a special chime once for 15 minutes after the hour, twice for 30 minutes after, three for 45 minutes after and four at the top of the hour.  The hour is announced with a different bell chime and the numerical ringing for exact number appropriate for the time.  Although there are some variations and the timing for each church might vary slightly, the church bells are a constant of the sounds of Switzerland. Trains.  Trains (and trams) are everywhere as well.  Given the Swiss trains “run on time” or at least mostly on time, we hear the trains passing by on a regular schedule.  The sound of the train varies by the type of train (e.g., local, regional, tilt train, fast train) and its destination.  There were also the cargo trains that sped rapidly through the train stations.  The differing sounds included the unique opening and closing of the doors which are dependent upon the train type – buzz or clicking type sounds and rolling out of the steps. Short whistles are blown when some trains are ready to depart as the conductor rushes onto the train.  Announcements are made in 4 or 5 languages (Swiss German, French, Italian, Romish, English).  And the sounds of the train stations themselves are like small cities with the hustle and bustle of shopping, eating and catching trains. Sounds of the city (e.g., Zurich, Milan, Basel, Strasbourg) are similar to other large cities. The sounds produced by the trams, buses, cars and pedestrians (especially tourists) are abundant and contribute to the overall sound of the city and traffic.  Bicycle traffic is apparent and contributes mightily to intensity of people moving about the city.  Because the 2016 UEFA League Championship were held in Milan, this year the sounds were especially loud and focused on the upcoming finals and team rivalry. Sounds in Riva San Vitale, Bellinzona and Lugano were less intense.  Sunrise (and even sunset) brought the sounds of birds and other natural events.  Rain and wind were common this year although the sounds varied with the extent of rain and the intensity of the wind. Sounds came from the lake and seemed to bounce from the mountain sides. Even the sunrise seemed to have a sound – a quiet unfolding of blue skies.  Early morning gatherings of local residents and their dogs were common.  Although I don’t understand Swiss Italian, there was pleasure in listening to the conversations of greeting and sharing among friends and neighbors. I felt as if I was allowed to ease-drop into the conversation and witness a moment without the disruption caused by outsiders.  (We don’t intend to disrupt but our presence changes the dynamic – another topic for the future is “ethical sightseeing”). Throughout the trip, the differing accents, words and inflections associated with regional dialects and languages were fun to detect and try to understand.  When we listen carefully, the ways in which English was spoken helps us understand more about the native language of the speaker.  As part of our education, we must thank our colleagues for speaking English and listening to us try to speak their language. Less obvious as “sound” perhaps were the sounds made by the GPP participants during our travels.  I can still hear conversations of participants as we walked toward a destination spanning at least two blocks.  Some voices carry more than others; some are not easily heard.  Others walked in silence, listening intently or saving our breath while ascending steps to ETH and UZh or Castlegrande in Bellinzona. Beyond the human voices, there were different sounds associated with walking on the cobblestones, rocks in the Villa’s garden and other types of pathways we encountered. Our voices increased in volume and intensity as the trip unfolded and we became more connected and comfortable with each other.  It was very clear to outside observers that we were “tourists” traveling together although our purpose was not known. The volume of our voices revealed our enthusiasm and excitement about the trip (and perhaps the loudness of individuals from the U.S.).  The volume and intensity varied across the days depending upon our daily schedule and extent of our activities.  There were times when we became silent or slept.  I noticed this during times of fatigue and toward the end of the trip as the transition back to our ‘former’ lives became more of a reality. A sound highlight this year was music.  Many participants shared their musical talent. Throughout the trip, we would hear music from the keyboard played in the villa’s main room or a guitar played in the fireplace room, or a spontaneous chorus of voices during some of our excursions.  There were sing-alongs in the village after hours and serenades to our wonderful benefactor Lucy after dinner and the marvelous Director Daniela.  An original song entitled “A rainy day in Riva San Vitale” was composed and performed by Willie Caldwell.  Thanks. It is somewhat difficult to capture the essence of sound in this blog but the sounds were real and provided wonderful additions to the experience.  In previous years, I have encouraged participants to observe the “windows and doors” and beyond.  Now I will add to “listen” carefully and to discover sounds that surround us. The GPP experience is truly about the sights and the sounds and much more.

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